Extinction Rebellion blockades private jet terminals at Luton

Climate campaigners have blockaded Luton airport’s Harrods Aviation and Signature private jet terminals to demand the government take urgent action to ban private jets and tax frequent flyers.

The protest by Extinction Rebellion and affiliated groups is part of a global co-ordinated action launched last week by climate activists across 11 countries, which is targeting sites in Europe, Australia, New Zealand, and the US.

Extinction Rebellion said: “Groups chose to take action today (February 14) due to the rise in the use of private jet flights for supposedly romantic Valentine’s Day dates, and to invite anyone watching to go to Parliament from April 21 to be part of 100,000 people calling for a citizen-led transition away from fossil fuels.”

From April 21 to April 24, the campaign group hopes to have 100,000 protestors around the Houses of Parliament for ‘The Big One’, calling for an end to the fossil fuel era.


Extinction Rebellion’s blue boat Polly Higgins is blocking all three gates to Luton airport’s Signature Terminal with protestors locked on to the deck and hull of the boat.

Another group of protestors is barricading the entrance to the Harrods Aviation Terminal, with activists locked onto two oil barrels.

More activists are gathered at both terminals dressed in hi-vis jackets, holding flags and banners in the style of airport signs, and wearing pink vests reading “Love In Action”.

Luton airport said in a statement: “We would like to reassure passengers that a peaceful protest taking place away from the main  terminal is not causing any disruption. Flights and access to the airport remain unaffected.”

Today’s protest is part of the ongoing “Make Them Pay” campaign which has three key demands: ban private jets, tax frequent flyers and make polluters pay.

The campaign highlights how 1% of the global population produces more than half of total aviation emissions, while 80% of the global population have never been on an aircraft.

Private jets are about 10 times more energy-intensive per passenger than commercial planes and 50 times more energy-intensive than trains, say campaigners.

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